This is an easy one. Don’t use meta refreshes or JavaScript-based redirects — these can wipe or replace referrer data, leading to direct traffic in Analytics. You should also be meticulous with your server-side redirects, and — as is often recommended by SEOs — audit your redirect file frequently. Complex chains are more likely to result in a loss of referrer data, and you run the risk of UTM parameters getting stripped out.
Ha ha ha, John, aren't you trying to be funny. Well I need to inform you that I have been to your site, read it and totally DON'T agree with you :P Your blog is great and I don't see many people running from it, lol. And definitely bookmark for future reference, there is no way to go through it in a day (I can't do it and I wrote it!). Hope you will use some of these and send me some feedback about the results.
We are here to give you the best web traffic you can get. We are experts in SEO methods and have been in this business for many years. We understand that our customers need to be our number one priority so one of our main objectives is to ensure the rapid growth of your website and to do everything to make your business more visible online.          
I've been sending out stamped self addressed reply cards...........that hasn't been going so well so maybe it shouldn't be # 51............... Hey, I'm doing a few of these; I need to get away from looking at it like a minefield and more as a u-pick-em strawberry patch. Good stuff as always Brankica; you still rock and lookie there, I didn't even leave any lipstick on your butt..............:)
The term “organic traffic” is used for referring to the visitors that land on your website as a result of unpaid (“organic”) search results. Organic traffic is the opposite of paid traffic, which defines the visits generated by paid ads. Visitors who are considered organic find your website after using a search engine like Google or Bing, so they are not “referred” by any other website.
×